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RFID tags! SPYWARE
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Cruzin
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Joined: 14 Mar 2004
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Location: nrthrn Ontario

PostPosted: Sat Jul 17, 2004 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Linc wrote:

Quote:
Damn good thread Dave,
My sentimemts exactly.

This is actually the best thread i have ever read! If I were the powers that be, it would have its own forum.

Reading Wawa Daves first posts I thought it was interesting in a read and forget kind of way. Now I strongly believe that this will be the biggest issue that this and the next generations will face.

The possibilities of these RFID tags for both the good and the bad seem to go beyond anyones imagination at this point. Technology could very well run amok. I wonder where the line will drawn, who will draw the line or will a line be drawn at all ?

Thanks WawaDave for sharing this information with us and getting the news out there.Big Thumb Up
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wawadave
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 17, 2004 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cruzin your wellcome!
hows black fly season in northern ontario? my old home.
i beleave its just to easy fot this tech to be abused. and i find a bit more on it each week. seems the news letter this week never came to me. lets hope bigbrother don,t stop the next ones.
its own form would be nice!
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2004 8:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RFID USERS SAY NO PRIVACY LAW NEEDED
Privacy advocates cite the need to protect consumers from potential
RFID abuses.
http://www.net-security.org/news.php?id=5618

Ya right!
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2004 1:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wipro Launches RFID Concept Store
By CXOtoday Staff
Mumbai, July 16, 2004

Wipro Technologies, the global IT services division of Wipro Limited, announced the launch of an RFID enabled concept store at its Electronic City campus in Bangalore on Wednesday.

The concept store demonstrates how item level RFID tagging enables automatic check-out, intelligent shrinkage avoidance, smart stock maintenance, and tracing and tracking of apparel by the store manager. The concept store showcases RFID technology being used across different business processes in a retail store. It has been launched to help customers understand the working of RFID in a real world environment. The concept store is part of the RFID center of excellence at Wipro Technologies.


“This is an example of our commitment to providing retailers with business driven technology solutions that enable them to improve store productivity and enhance the customer’s buying experience” said Bhanu Murthy, vice president for retail, CPG and distribution at Wipro Technologies.

Speaking on the occasion, Jayasri Guha, vice president (finance and procurement standardization) Weyerhaeuser, said, “Over the past six years Weyerhaeuser and Wipro have developed a very strong working relationship with each. Weyerhaeuser is tracking the RFID technology closely and we are exploring how it can be leveraged to improve supply chain efficiency.”

Through its centre of excellence, Wipro is also providing consultancy on the effect of RFID technology on privacy and public policy. Earlier in November 2003 Wipro had presented a white paper at the RFID Privacy Workshop at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2004 12:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

this is a some what humores one to read.
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/07/19/bofh_2004_episode_23/
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 21, 2004 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 19, 2004

MEXICAN GOVERNMENT PROMOTES MYTH OF RFID SECURITY
Chip implants won't help crime wracked country, could make things worse

"Promoting implanted RFID devices as a security measure is downright
'loco,'" says Katherine Albrecht, Founder and Director of CASPIAN
(Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering).
"Advertising you've got a chip in your arm that opens important doors is
an invitation to kidnapping and mutilation."

That's Albrecht's response to the announcement by Mexican Attorney
General Rafael Macedo de la Concha that he and 160 other Mexican
officials were implanted with Verichip RFID devices. Reportedly, the
chips allow the implanted employees to access secure areas of the
Attorney General's headquarters.

Albrecht surmises that Macedo de la Concha made the ill advised
revelation in the wake of citizen protests against corruption in the
crime wracked country. "Selling the idea of RFID chipping as the
solution to rampant crime may be politically expedient, but it's
dangerous misinformation. He could encourage the Mexican people to seek
the implants thinking RFID is their ticket to security. RFID implants
may offer the illusion of safety from kidnappers, but in reality, they
put their users at peril."

While there are promises of future implantable RFID devices that could
be globally trackable even in remote areas, the read range of the
VeriChip devices currently marketed is only a few inches, Albrecht
explains. While that small read range could be critical to someone
desperate to access a secure area, it would do little to locate a kidnap
victim hidden miles away from reader devices.

Ironically, rather than protecting their wearers from kidnapping,
implantable security devices may actually turn their wearers into
tempting targets for Mexico's notorious kidnapping gangs, especially as
the chips migrate to serve as payment devices, says Albrecht. "What
could be more inviting to kidnappers than a chip that offers access to
secure areas or someone's bank account? If criminals want to get ahold
of a chip, they will naturally try to nab a person wearing one."

The potentially gruesome implications of being probed for an implanted
chip are obvious, said Albrecht. She points out that at least one
Mexican kidnapping gang, a group nicknamed "el chip" for its interest in
RFID implants, is focused on the technology. According to recent
reports, its members have stripped kidnapping victims and demanded to be
told where they have chips implanted in their bodies.


Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering (CASPIAN)
is a grass-roots consumer group fighting retail surveillance schemes
since 1999, and item-level RFID tagging since 2002. With thousands of
members in all 50 U.S. states and over 30 countries worldwide, CASPIAN
seeks to educate consumers about marketing strategies that invade their
privacy and to encourage privacy-conscious shopping habits across the
retail spectrum.

For more information, see http://www.spychips.com

###
==========================================================

CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering)
is a consumer group fighting retail surveillance schemes since 1999, and
item-level RFID tagging since 2002. With thousands of members in all 50
U.S. states and over 30 countries worldwide, CASPIAN seeks to educate
consumers about marketing strategies that invade their privacy and to
encourage privacy-conscious shopping habits across the retail spectrum.

For more information, see:
http://www.spychips.com and http://www.nocards.org

See our campaigns at:
http://www.BoycottGillette.com
http://www.BoycottBenetton.org

==========================================================

We encourage you to duplicate and distribute this message to others.

==========================================================
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 23, 2004 11:53 am    Post subject: Professor Develops RFID Reader Wristwatch Reply with quote

Professor Develops RFID Reader Wristwatch
By CXOtoday Staff
Mumbai, July 16, 2004

Professor Ken Sakamura of the University of Tokyo recently unveiled the "UC-Watch," a radio frequency identification (RFID) reader developed by the YRP Ubiquitous Networking Laboratory that Sakamura directs.

The watch will allow information of an object with an RFID tag to be scanned just by picking it up. As the task of holding the reader against an RFID is no longer required, efficiency of labor will improve.


The watch was unveiled during Sakamura's speech on July 7 at the 7th Embedded Systems Expo & Conference held at Tokyo. The trial model was revealed in succession to the "Ubiquitous Communicator," a PDA-type RFID reader, and the "UC-Phone," a mobile phone.

The UC-Watch is based on "u (micro) UC," the portable RFID reader function set that the lab has specified on its own. Now it is possible to produce UC pendants and UC badges.

The UC-Watch features a function to read data based on "ucode," an RFID numbering system that the Ubiquitous ID Center standardized. Scanned data is transmitted through weak radio waves. It also complies with the security specifications "eTRON" by the TRON project hosted by Sakamura.

The watch has a screen of 120 x 160 dots. The time and date each are displayed as a clock function, and background images and menus can be changed. It weighs around 100g without batteries. The company is working on reducing the weight.
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 26, 2004 10:16 am    Post subject: RFID goes to the dogs Reply with quote

RFID goes to the dogs
cnet

By MATT HINES
Staff Writer, CNET News.com

Once a tech industry darling, radio frequency identification tags have officially gone to the dogs.

Actually, RFID remains a hot topic in hardware, software and retail markets, but other applications of the technology, which marries microchips with radio antennas to foster easier tracking of inventory, have taken wing, or at least paw. On Friday, Digital Angel, which sells RFID scanning and communications tools for tracking everything from airplanes to farm animals, announced that it had won a $600-million deal to affix radio tags to 200,000 dogs in Portugal.

The deal was granted under a government initiative to control rabies in the country. Portuguese legislators have mandated that the estimated 2 million canines in the nation must be implanted with radio tags and registered in a national database by 2007. Digital Angel's deal covers the first 200,000 animals to be tagged under the program. The company said it will bid on the rest of the Portuguese business over the next two years.

"We fought like cats and dogs for this business," said Digital Angel chief executive Kevin McGrath. "Seriously though, we think it's a great opportunity to show off how reliable and easy to read our RFID products are."

RFID chips for animals, which are typically extremely small devices injected via syringe under the creature's skin, are nothing new. The chips are programmed with an animal's pertinent data, such as its name and owner's address, and can be scanned using a handheld device. Other European countries already require that pets have RFID chips or tattoos for quick identification. In the United States, McGrath estimated, about 6,000 tagged animals were returned to their owners using RFID technology last year alone.

However, the Digital Angel deal underscores the growth of RFID as a mainstream technology. The company has plans to release a new product next year that not only stores animals' data but also takes their temperature, to help consumers figure out whether an animal might be sick. McGrath says such applications, which could conceivably save pet owners and farmers-millions of dollars on visits to the vet, will help drive RFID into many new consumer markets.

Over the last year, RFID has gotten a big push forward from the retail sector, where radio tags are being deployed by several major chains, including Wal-Mart Stores and Target, to improve inventory management and related supply chain logistics. But the technology is also finding favour in a number of other venues, such as at Narita Airport in Japan, where passengers' luggage is being tagged to help match items with the specific individuals who check them, to guard against terrorism. Delta Airlines has announced a similar plan to begin tagging bags.

In another, more controversial application, Japanese officials in the city of Osaka have decided to run a test under which children in one primary school will be tagged with chips to track their movements. Denmark's Legoland introduced a similar scheme this year to stop young children going astray.
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 28, 2004 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Siemens to pilot RFID bracelets for health care
Others seek to implant data under the skin



By Ephraim Schwartz July 23, 2004

Siemens Business Services announced this week a pilot project with Jacobi Medical Center in New York to track patients by incorporating RFID chips into the ubiquitous plastic band strapped onto patients' wrists during hospital admissions.


RFID in Medicine
(Claudio Palma's Digital Claudio)



Encoded on the band is patient name, date of birth, gender, and a medical record number, linked to the hospital network that connects the patient record to labs, billing, and the pharmacy.

Doctors and nurses will be equipped with a tablet-style PC with an RFID reader and a Wi-Fi connection to access the network.

Today, after admitting a patient, most hospitals generate a plastic identity card which, like a credit card, imprints the patient ID onto a piece of paper inserted into the sleeve of a patient's wristband.

Jerry Moy, senior client executive at Siemens, said he has seen clerks and nurses with scissors cutting the paper and trying to stuff it into the wrist band.

"It's medieval, to say the least," said Moy.

The RFID project includes software and rolls of wristbands already embedded with RFID chips. When admitted, the basic patient information is put into the application and run through a printer encoder that impresses the patient data onto the RFID chip.

The goal is to reduce the risk of misidentifying patients and to access patient records in a more timely process, Moy said.

While the use of RFID chips on hospital wristbands may appear to be cutting edge in the United States, an initiative in Mexico City appears to be on the bleeding edge.

According to a published report in The Washington Post, about 1,000 patients, some suffering from Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and other chronic illnesses, have been implanted with an RFID chip about the size of a grain of rice for purposes of identification.

Made by Applied Digital Solutions (ADS), the VeriChip is a miniaturized RFID chip with applications in health care, security, and tracking.

The ADS Web site says that the chip is usually implanted in the upper arm and is introduced under the skin by the equivalent of a flu inoculation.

Because of its small size, the chip contains only a unique verification number which, once implanted, connects to the larger network in a similar fashion as the Siemens' solution using RFID readers and Wi-Fi.

Other uses include implantable payment systems which, like a mobile speed pass, transmits the unique owner's ID number and links it to designated credit card data.

Reports from Mexico City also say that 160 members of the Mexican Attorney General's office had the VeriChip implanted as a means of secure access to a new, centralized anti-crime datacenter.

While embedding RFID chips in patients would have to be approved in the United States by the U.S. federal Drug Administration, the ADS Web site already lists numerous health care centers and private medical practices in the United States as distributors.

Castle Hills Family Practice in San Antonio, Texas, for example, confirmed that it is planning to use VeriChips in its practice.

Katherine Albrecht, founder and director of CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering) said her biggest concern is that in the future a tyrannical state would adopt RFID implants as a way to monitor the activity of its citizens.

"This is tailor-made technology for abuse," said Albrecht.
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2004 7:45 am    Post subject: RFID TAGS BECOME HACKER TARGET Reply with quote

RFID TAGS BECOME HACKER TARGET
Privacy advocates may not be the only people taking issue with the
current crop of radio-frequency identification tags--merchants will
likely have problems with a lack of security as well, a German
technology consultant said Wednesday.
http://www.net-security.org/news.php?id=5705
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2004 11:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Security Shocker: RFID Data Can Be Hacked
By CXOtoday Staff
Mumbai, July 30, 2004

At a time when the adoption of RFID is still at its nascent stage, especially in the Indian market, research data presented at the recent Black Hat 2004 computer security convention suggests that RFID is by no means safe from the hacking dragnet.

Lukas Grunwald, a senior consultant with DN-Systems Enterprise Solutions GmbH, speaking at the convention, announced that he has co-developed a program called RFDump that would allow reading and modifying data within an RFID tag using a text or hex editor.


Citing probable instances of the abuse of RFID, at the convention, Grunwald said that since data can be modified freely, a customer in a departmental store might mark a lower price on a product before paying at the counter or one can reprogram the inventory of a store. This means RFID, can be, in effect hacked. Thus this is a timely warning that blind adoption of RFID might leave security holes for hackers to exploit.

He recognized that it is the expensive RFID reader hardware and hard-to-use software, which has hindered security research in the area.

http://www.rf-dump.org/
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2004 7:53 am    Post subject: BEHIND THE RFID-STANDARDS BRAWL Reply with quote

BEHIND THE RFID-STANDARDS BRAWL
"The fact of the matter is," says Gartner research analyst Jeff
Woods, "end-users are not paying enough attention to the
RFID-standards issue. That makes them vulnerable to being mislead by
competing factions and vulnerable to making poor technology choices."
http://www.net-security.org/news.php?id=5770
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2004 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BLACK HAT DAY 2 SOUNDS SECURITY ALARM
Black Hat day two concluded with a great talk on how to use Google to
find vulnerable Websites. RFID vulnerabilities were also discussed in
an exclusive THG video interview with RFID expert Lukas Grunwald.
http://www.net-security.org/news.php?id=5737
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 14, 2004 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What is holding up RFID implementations?
========================================
LogicaCMG is a consulting and systems integration firm that is at the leading
edge of helping companies design and implement RFID projects.
http://www.it-analysis.com/article.php?id=12151&zz=60786a6512533

lets hope it keeps holding them up!
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 20, 2004 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1637260,00.asp

eWEEK.com Special Report: RFID
Controversy Flares Over RFID Patent Fees
Intermec's plans to seek patent licensing fees for RFID tags and readers has competitors crying foul.
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 20, 2004 11:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

August 07, 2004
RFID

I've come up with the killer RFID app. This hits home like nothing before. The act of tracking packages in transit or at the discount store pales in importance. The killer RFID app seeks to solve a very simple, yet pervasive problem that affects us all. And it seeks to help us where we need the help the most: at home.

RFID (Radio frequency identification) technology provides a means to store and retrieve data using RFID tags. RFID tags are tiny antenna-bearing transmitters that are built into or affixed (using a label) to a host object. These tags are designed to receive and respond to RFID transceivers. RFID systems are increasingly used as inventory control methods, and can be found tracking items as diverse as family pets, beer kegs, shipping palettes library books, and airline baggage.

This takes it a step further ...

How much further? How about into your sock drawer?

How many times have you misplaced a single sock? You have five minutes to get dressed and get out the door. You're running around the place, completely stressed out. You have one sock, but its mate is nowhere to be found. "Where's that #$%&@! sock?"

Just where those pesky AWOL things go, it's impossible to say. They might fall into a black hole behind the clothes dryer. Or maybe your little brother or significant other likes to play cruel tricks by hiding them.

The cause doesn't matter. The killer RFID app would solve the age-old problem of the missing sock.

Here's how it would work:

Each item of clothing (say, a sock) would have a special encapsulated RFID tag sewn into an unobtrusive place. Encapsulated RFID tags use a protective coating to prevent damage, ensuring that they survive harsh environments (in this case, the clothes washer and dryer). Wireless battery-powered active RFID transponders would be positioned throughout the house.

Your PC would run a program to pull inventory information from the household RFID grid. You would know where each and every RFID tagged item is located at any given moment.

The missing sock dilemma would be solved. Collective blood pressures would be lowered. Peace would reign in the land. And your little brother or significant other would have to find a new way to irritate you.

Of course, it's not just about socks. It's about those missing keys, remote controls, favorite shirts, and dog leashes. With the right setup and a RFID tag, everything could be located within your household matrix with a few clicks.

Science fiction? Or just a few years away?
Posted by geekbooks at August 7, 2004 05:28 PM
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2004 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

JAPANESE BANK USES RFID FOR DOCUMENT SECURITY
NEC has signed a contract with a Japanese bank for a radio frequency
ID-based document management system.
http://www.net-security.org/news.php?id=5859
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 24, 2004 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

FEATURE: GROWING PAINS
=====================================================================

First, I believe I speak for Katherine Albrecht and all the CASPIAN
staff in apologizing for the unintended interruption in the newsletter.
This has been a busy summer of travel and public appearances for me, as
well as Katherine, and when juggling so many balls, a few inevitably
drop.

One of the reasons the newsletter has been AWOL so long is the
participation of both Katherine and myself at this year's Eris Society
conference. I was one of the organizers, and Katherine delivered an
excellent, jaw-dropping presentation on RFID tracking capabilities. (For
those who may be interested, an audio cassette recording of her
presentation will be available; I will publish the URL for ordering it
when it's available.)

I thought that, with my dual hats as news reporter for this publication
as well as another one, I was pretty up to date on RFID tracking
technology. I'm almost embarrassed to admit that some of what Katherine
talked about surprised even me -- but it caught many of the Eris
attendees completely unaware. She did an excellent job covering all the
bases, and was one of the best (and most sought-after) speakers of the
entire conference.

So, the summer has been a time of growing pains for CASPIAN, as we
juggled the challenges of launching the newsletter, coordinating our
activist goals with your interests and the available (just about
nonexistent) budget, and trying to keep up with the explosion of
consumer privacy issues.

Fortunately, it's also been a season of growing pains for the
pushers of privacy-threatening technology. While various corporate
entities have been enthusiastically pushing RFID tagging, many CEOs
still don't understand the technology and overall, don't seem to be in a
hurry to embrace it -- especially since costs are still on the high
side. Privacy advocates' messages have had a major impact in slowing
adoption of the technology and many within the privacy and engineering
communities are working to find ways to render RFID tags and the
information they contain useless.

One of the strongest voices on general privacy issues of late has been
the ACLU. An August report titled "The Surveillance-Industrial Complex"
documents what CASPIAN has been saying for years – that the U.S.
government and corporations are working together to create a
surveillance society:
http://www.aclu.org/SafeandFree/SafeandFree.cfm?ID=16226&c=282

They conclude that individual activism is an important part of checking
both state and industry abuse of consumer information. Many individuals
appear to have already conceded the battle, thinking that with so many
Goliaths to fight, the Davids just can't win. Such defeatist thinking
certainly doesn't help the odds! As public awareness mounts on consumer
privacy issues, our voices have gained momentum. Also, more information
is becoming available on ways to tweak or defeat both tags and readers:


http://news.com.com/RFID+tags+become+hacker+target/2100-1029_3-5287912.html
(paste to above to get complete link)

Meanwhile, users of RFID tagging have been very hard at work trying to
tout the benefits of using this technology:

http://www.pcworld.idg.com.au/index.php/id;1489605519;fp;2;fpid;1
..http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/articleview/989/1/1/

Its use in hospitals is being promoted as a safety mechanism for
patients, and to track staff:

http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/articleview/1088/1/1/

What proponents seem to forget, however, is that any technology is only
as good as the individuals using it. Wearing an RFID-chipped badge will
no more protect a patient from receiving the wrong care than do the
current wrist bands, since medical staff errors almost always result
from human carelessness rather than insufficient or inadequate
technology.

We privacy advocates have been sounding the alarm for years, and our
hard work is beginning to pay off. The seeds we have planted to educate
the public about consumer privacy issues have begun to sprout. There is
more mainstream awareness of the problem than ever before, and our
opponents are scrambling to respond. It's a season of growing pains for
the industry as well as the activists -- and if we keep our goals in
sight and work diligently toward them, we can turn back the tide of
tracking everything everywhere.

Confidentially yours,

Sunni


=====================================================================

ACTIVISM TOOLS YOU CAN USE
=====================================================================

SHOPPING WITHOUT A CARD
by Katherine Albrecht, CASPIAN Founder

People living in towns where all the major supermarkets have gone to
cards often write to tell us they feel compelled to use a "loyalty" card
that monitors their shopping. They believe they have no other choice.

How have we gotten to such a pass? And what is the solution? A few years
back I clearly saw that the solution to a dwindling number of "good"
stores was to be nice to the ones we had left. If we consumers want to
encourage consumer-friendly practices, we have to seek out stores that
treat us well and support them with our money. Thank them. Write them
letters of praise. Recommend them to our friends and family members.

The basic responsibility of every consumer in a market-based, capitalist
society is to reward good behavior with money and punish bad behavior by
withholding it. Apparently a fair number consumers have been doing just
that. CASPIAN's Associate Director John Vanderlippe has been watching
the financial figures for grocery chains across the country. He reports
that card-free chains like Publix, Meijer, and Trader Joe's have been
doing fairly well in recent years, while stores with newly-minted card
programs like Winn Dixie and Albertsons are not doing well at all.

Interestingly, we've watched many stores experience a steep drop in
profitability just a few quarters after introducing a new card program.
The card -- and the anti-shopper mentality behind it -- appears to have
a negative effect on the bottom line over time. That's good news for us
consumers. It means the market is working.

Now comes the hard part for people stranded in a sea of card stores: we
have to keep boycotting the stores that treat us poorly until they see
the error of their ways.

If you're one of the lucky ones and you still have a major card-free
grocery chain left in your town, SHOP THERE! The Wall Street Journal,
CBS Evening News, and dozens of local news outlets have all confirmed
that you will pay less for your groceries at a card-free chain than you
will at a comparable card store -- even if you take advantage of the
supposed "card savings." And you'll be doing your part by punishing the
card stores with your absence.

But what if all of the advertised, big-name, national chains around you
have gone to cards? When I started CASPIAN in 1999, boycotting card
stores simply meant driving an extra mile or two down the street to
another major store without a card. But it's getting harder to find a
card-free national chain anymore. In your town there may not be a single
major supermarket left without a card. So what's a conscientious shopper
to do?

The answer is to leave the mega-chains and find alternative grocery
shopping options. If you live in a metropolitan area, there are probably
several non-famous (i.e., not advertised) supermarkets that you've
driven past and not even noticed. These are typically local,
family-owned businesses that are unlikely to start asking you to pay for
your groceries with an iris scan or a chip implant. Even most of you who
live in rural areas can still probably find a family-owned local store
somewhere. Seek these stores out and give them your business -- and
thank them. They may be our last refuge against the trend toward total
shopper surveillance.

I make a mental note of any supermarket I pass whose name I do not
recognize, and do a private high-five with the universe that such stores
still exist. If I have time, I'll stop in to buy a soda and chat with
the checker to see if they have a card or plans to implement one. They
almost never do.

In many ways, these stores remind me of the markets of my childhood.
They are typically smaller than the big chains, not as well lit, and
overall not as "slick." But that can be a good thing. Not only does it
mean the store is probably not experimenting with the latest in GPS
shopping cart tracking technology (see:
http://www.sorensen-associates.com/files/pathtracker.pdf) or slipping
you an RFID-laced loyalty card (see:
http://www.spychips.com/metro/scandal-payback.html or
http://www.ti.com/tiris/docs/solutions/pos/loyalty.shtml), it means
there are fewer layers of bureaucracy between you and the owner, so your
complaints and praise go right to the top -- you actually matter to the
store.

The prices may be a little higher at a small, locally owned store, but I
figure I'd gladly drop $5-$10 into a "keep good stores alive" fund if
such a thing existed, so why should't I transfer the same $5-$10 in a
more efficient way -- directly to the owner of a good store himself? It
will certainly go a long way to keeping these stores around.

If there's a lesson I've learned in five years of conscientious
shopping, it's that there's more to looking out for your best interest
than simply finding the store with the cheapest price. If protecting
your privacy and keeping independent food retailers in business means
paying a few extra dollars to a locally owned store, do it with a smile
-- and dont forget to say "thanks" on your way out.

=====================================================================

CASPIAN: Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering
Opposing supermarket "loyalty" cards and other retail surveillance
schemes since 1999

http://www.nocards.org/
http://www.spychips.com/

You're welcome to duplicate and distribute this message to others who
may find it of interest.

=====================================================================
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 27, 2004 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

After reading this Dave,
http://www.aclu.org/SafeandFree/SafeandFree.cfm?ID=16226&c=282

I think the terroists have already won, your Govt is so intent on spying on their own citizens, they just won't have time to look for terroists, so they [the terroists]can leave you alone and concentrate on causing hardships to put it mildly in the rest of the world.

I'm afraid your World Policeman is so intent on becoming Big Brother, it's forgotten what they started.

And a govt that slips laws in to place is not one to be trusted.

We're heading the same way, on a smaller scale in my local area
the county council held a sudden meeting as the leader of the present council was in jail and they had to elect another, the ruling party held this meeting and just scrape by with the required quorum, but the the other party was banned the reason given was they would be biased.

Oh how nice and good is democracy.
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 27, 2004 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

link i,m nort of the usa looking in from out side just like you!
and it don,t look goog thats good artical you got!
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2004 7:48 pm    Post subject: CASPIAN NEWSLETTER, 09/06/04: Major US Retailers going to RF Reply with quote

CASPIAN NEWSLETTER, 09/06/04: Major US Retailers going to RFID

=====================================================================
Consumer privacy and RFID newsletter
Edited by Katherine Albrecht
(filling in this month for Sunni Maravillosa)

THIS WEEK:
1- Major US retailers going to RFID
2- Metro to expand RFID program to 200+ stores
3- Illinois to double tolls for cash payers
4- Refusing to be tracked with a toll pass
5- Insurer offers discount to monitor your driving
6- Former So-Cal card-store shoppers happier elsewhere
7- Lamenting the loss of local stores
8- Cell phones and PDAs to peddle ads to shoppers?
9- Japanese loyalty card measures UV rays
10- Marketers covet your wedding, childbirth, retirement info
11- Casino to store terabytes of customer data
12- Flashback: FBI obtained records on Vegas-goers
13- FCC plans TV you can't turn off

14- Activism tools you can use: Card-free shopping Part II

=====================================================================
MAJOR US RETAILERS GOING TO RFID
=====================================================================

Kroger, CVS and other big retailers are set to issue RFID mandates of
their own soon, according to a recent webcast co-sponsored by Matrics,
an RFID supplier. Wal-Mart, Target and Albertsons have already issued
mandates to their suppliers, resulting in millions of dollars of
infrastructure investment in RFID tagging and item tracking. "By now,
all of the top 25 retailers have RFID initiatives either in place or
under consideration," said one executive.

Source: EWeek; August 19, 2004
http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1637598,00.asp

=====================================================================
METRO TO EXPAND RFID PROGRAM TO 200+ STORES
=====================================================================

Mega-retailer Metro (with 240,000 employees and stores in 28 countries)
plans to expand its RFID program to involve 100 suppliers and 269 stores
by the end of 2005. Gerd Wolfram, RFID project manager, said that
item-level tagging is still 10-20 years off (despite using it in their
Rheinberg store) although others say that it's inevitable.

The article gives CASPIAN a nod, and explains that RFID will cost jobs:

"Metro, in particular, has felt the wrath of campaign group Consumers
Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering (CASPIAN), which
protested outside the Future Store when RFID tags were found in loyalty
cards. [Note: It was actually FoeBud who organized the protest, but we
did have a hand in it. - ed.]

However, some believe that it's a case of when, not if, for item-level
tagging. "Undoubtedly, item-level tagging will come," said Simon
Merriott, senior manager of RFID applications at consultants Kurt Salmon
Associates.

Privacy aside, RFID might still be unable to dodge the bullets of
controversy. [One] study...predicted that 4 million jobs will be
affected by the technology in the United States alone....[Metro's]
Wolfram quoted figures of a labor reduction of 17 percent but said no
jobs would be lost. "There won't be a reduction of labor--it will be a
shift of labor," he said, with workers reassigned to different duties."

Hmmm, why do I have a hard time believing this?

Source: CNET; September 2, 2004
http://zdnet.com.com/2100-1103_2-5344957.html

For info on Metro's item-level tagging trial, see CASPIAN's special
12-page Metro report (which includes photos of Katherine's tour of the
store) here:
http://www.spychips.com/metro/albrecht-tour-3.html

=====================================================================
ILLINOIS TO DOUBLE TOLLS FOR CASH PAYERS
=====================================================================

To encourage use of the state's I-Pass toll transponder (an active RFID
device), Illinois Gov. Blagojevich has announced a plan to double toll
fees for drivers who pay tolls in cash. Under the new plan, cash users
will be charged 80 cents per toll -- a 100% surcharge over the current
toll rate of 40 cents. Those who allow the state to track their travels
with I-Pass will continue to pay the lower rate.

The plan requires approval from the Illinois toll board. Concerned
residents should contact the board to voice their opinions:

* List of Toll Board members: http://tinyurl.com/6l35y
* Toll Board contact page: http://tinyurl.com/52bzx

Source: Chicago Sun Times, August 26, 2004
(Cached at: http://tinyurl.com/58yk2)

=====================================================================
REFUSING TO BE TRACKED WITH A TOLL PASS
=====================================================================

Many motorists refuse to use toll transponders since the devices allow
government toll operators to record their identity and the time and date
of each time they pass through a toll booth. This information is
regularly handed over to other government agencies without a warrant,
and has been used against drivers in court cases and divorce litigation.
Toll transponders beam out identifying information whether they're near
a toll booth or not, a feature that makes them tempting targets for
government agents to identify and track cars on non-toll roads, as well.

See these links for more information:

http://www.notbored.org/EZ-Pass.html
http://www.drivers.com/article/572/

The government of Ontario, Canada, recognizing the importance of
anonymous travel in a free society, created a way for motorists to use
toll passes without the risk of being identified and tracked. See their
PDF linked below for details on the anonymous toll transponder system:

http://www.ipc.on.ca/userfiles/page_attachments/407-e.pdf

=====================================================================
INSURER OFFERS DISCOUNT TO MONITOR YOUR DRIVING
=====================================================================

Auto insurance companies may join supermarkets in offering "discounts"
to those who comply with a monitoring agenda. Progressive, an Ohio-based
auto insurance company, is offering up to a 25% discount to drivers who
allow the company to install a matchbox-sized device in their cars to
monitor their driving habits. Though the company says the program is
voluntary, if the idea is emulated by other insurers, it could someday
be hard to avoid without paying a massive surcharge on your insurance.

Writes John Vanderlippe, our Associate Director: "Of course you don't
have to join our black box program Mr. Johnson. Ok, lets see... coverage
for your 1982 Tercel, in rural Iowa where you drive 3,000 miles
annually, is available for our low rate of $4,375 per year"

Source: Associated Press via MSNBC; September 2, 2004
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/5898175

=====================================================================
FORMER SO-CAL CARD-STORE SHOPPERS HAPPIER ELSEWHERE
=====================================================================

Albertsons has been struggling to regain the customers it lost during
the Southern California grocery strike earlier this year. Looking for a
short term boost in profits to compensate for dwindling customer
numbers, the store introduced a card program (could they be any
stupider?) then wondered why their customers never returned from
card-free competitors Stater Brothers, Jensens, and Trader Joes.
Shoppers found lower prices and less surveillance elsewhere -- and have
not bothered to return.

Said one shopper of the switch from Albertsons to Stater Brothers: "To
go from paying $200 and now we're paying $150 for groceries -- we're
getting the same stuff for less." The article adds, "Multiply [this
shopper's] experience by tens of thousands, and you have a major problem
still facing big-chain grocers Ralphs, Vons and Albertsons six months
after the strike was settled."

Not surprisingly, each of these grocers has a shopper surveillance card.

Source: The Desert Sun; September 4, 2004
http://www.thedesertsun.com/news/stories2004/business/20040904030540.shtml

=====================================================================
LAMENTING THE LOSS OF LOCAL STORES
=====================================================================

Are low price and convenience worth pursuing at any cost? Not according
to Stephen Jardine of the Scotsman, who writes: "I can remember shopping
with my granny as a child in a grocer’s where the shelves were piled
with exotic tins and packets, the counters heaved with butter and bacon
and freshly baked bread, and the sweet smell of roasting coffee beans
lingered in the air. Now, like everyone else, I shuffle around the vast
aircraft hangar trying to remember if mustard is near the fish or the
DVDs...."

Source: The Scotsman; September 2, 2004
http://news.scotsman.com/opinion.cfm?id=1030622004

=====================================================================
CELL PHONES AND PDA'S TO PEDDLE ADS TO SHOPPERS?
=====================================================================

Direct from the article:

"With PDAs and cell phones getting more advanced, one retail transaction
vendor wants to turn those consumer gadgets into two-way,
advertisement-friendly checkout devices....The retailer would benefit
because of the increased loyalty and the potential to display customized
advertising and promotions. Some consumers might regard those electronic
promotion coupons as an incentive and a bonus, while others would regard
them as an intrusion and a price to pay for convenience.

...A consumer would walk into a store and point his or her PDA to a
kiosk. The palmtop would quickly identify the consumer and flash an
alert that, for example, the customer's favorite shoe vendor is having a
40 percent off sale for select customers and that the consumer's
particular shoe size and favorite color are in stock.

"You'd be literally carrying your token within your cell phone" or PDA.
There is nothing new about doing a quick analysis of the contents of a
consumer's purchase and then rewarding that consumer with a free item or
a discount coupon....

Source: Eweek; August 25, 2004
http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1639329,00.asp

=====================================================================
JAPANESE LOYALTY CARD MEASURES UV RAYS
=====================================================================

Asian shoppers have become so jaded by the plastic in their wallets that
loyalty card issuers have to dream up new gimmicks to keep them
interested. Take the new Wacao lingerie store loyalty card, for
instance. It comes with a sensor to measure ultraviolet sun exposure for
women who are "sensitive about protecting their skin." (Though a card
carried in a woman's purse would seem a poor choice for this
application.) Rather than worry about wallet-penetrating UV rays, Wacao
shoppers should instead be alarmed to learn that the card is the first
to carry Taiwan's National Credit Card Centre's chip-based loyalty
program, which facilitates the sharing of personal data with over 200
merchants across the country.

Source: Finextra; September 2, 2004
http://www.finextra.com/topstory.asp?id=12424

=====================================================================
MARKETERS COVET YOUR WEDDING, CHILDBIRTH, RETIREMENT INFO
=====================================================================

Axciom's own words are more disturbing than anything we could say about
them. Here's a doozy straight from the company's press office:

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – August 11, 2004 –Acxiom Corporation (Nasdaq: ACXM)
today announced the release of Personicx LifeChangesSM, the only
consumer segmentation system of its kind that allows marketers to target
receptive customers as they move through life variations that affect
their purchase behavior.

“Acxiom’s latest innovation will offer marketers the ability to
anticipate customer behavior and provide the right product at the right
time,” said Acxiom Company Leader Charles D. Morgan. “Personicx
LifeChanges gives companies a competitive edge, in essence providing
them with the power to market to consumers as they change from one life
stage to the next. This has never been done before.”

Personicx is a household-level segmentation system that...tracks the
migration of households from one Personicx life stage cluster to another
by using Acxiom’s InfoBase List prospect file....Some specific events
such as marriage, the purchase of a home, the birth of a child or
preparation for retirement are likely to result in a cluster change.

“Movement from one life stage cluster to another can trigger a prime
marketing opportunity,” said [an Acxiom executive]....By recognizing
households whose life stage has changed companies can target consumers
with a heightened readiness for new products and services associated
with their new life stage status..."The sooner these consumers are
approached, the quicker the response and the shorter the payback
period,” [he] said.

Source: Acxiom press release; August 11, 2004
http://www.acxiom.com/default.aspx?ID=2563

=====================================================================
CASINO TO STORE TERABYTES OF CUSTOMER DATA
=====================================================================

The following is an article excerpt:

"Resort and casino operator MGM Mirage is using data integration
technology to get to know its customers better. 'To compete in the
crowded casino resort market, we need a detailed understanding of our
guests...' says [MGM]. "MGM Mirage is implementing...'a terabyte-level
data integration project'...to integrate, profile, cleanse and load more
than 50 million customer records and over 400 million transactions into
a new data warehouse in real time to yield insight into customer
spending habits...[to] cater to the preferences and purchasing habits of
individual guests. "The solution will help the resort integrate data
from many sources...including demographics and specifics about what
customers spend on food, gaming, entertainment, hotel and spa visits at
all MGM Mirage properties."

Source: KM World; June 1, 2004
http://www.kmworld.com/publications/magazine/index.cfm?action=readarticle&Article_ID=1833&Publication_ID=113
Tiny URL: http://tinyurl.com/6sr8v

=====================================================================
FLASHBACK: FBI OBTAINED RECORDS ON VEGAS-GOERS
=====================================================================

The detailed data collected by casinos is a tempting target for
government snoops looking to circumvent the 4th Amendment, as this story
reveals:

"As hundreds of thousands of New Year's Eve revelers flocked to Las
Vegas last year, most had no idea that the FBI knew their names, the
flights they took and the hotels where they were staying. In an effort
to combat terrorism, the FBI requested that hotels and airlines turn
over all passenger and guest lists between Dec. 22, 2003, and Jan. 1.
The hotels and airlines complied, electronically transmitting personal
information on about 270,000 visitors..."

Source: Austin American-Statesman (Texas); March 22, 2004
SECTION: News; Pg. A1

=====================================================================
FCC PLANS TV YOU CAN'T TURN OFF
=====================================================================

The FCC is working with the Department of Homeland Security on plans to
turn our TVs and radios on automatically, so "residents could receive
warnings even when the device is turned off --- at night when they are
asleep, for instance." FCC officials might want to dig out their high
school copies of 1984:

"Winston turned a switch and the voice sank somewhat, though the words
were still distinguishable. The instrument (the telescreen, it was
called) could be dimmed, but there was no way of shutting it off
completely...."

Source:

Source: NewsMax; August 25, 2004
http://www.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2004/8/24/210743.shtml

=====================================================================
ACTIVISM TOOLS YOU CAN USE
=====================================================================

SHOPPING WITHOUT A CARD: PART II
Ethnic markets

The second in a series on card-free shopping
by Katherine Albrecht

In the last newsletter, I pointed out that as consumers in a free
market, we have a responsibility to withhold our shopping dollars from
companies that engage in practices we abhor. This may mean boycotting
supermarkets that impose "loyalty"-card-based data collection programs
on their shoppers or boycotting the developers and adopters of RFID. For
most of us, it means both. But I realize it can be hard to stick to your
resolve if you can't find alternatives to the surveillance-heavy
national supermarket chains.

In that column, I suggested that if you can no longer find a large
card-free chain in your area, it's worth spending a few extra dollars
each week to support a higher-priced, family-owned, local grocer. As far
as I'm concerned, anything would be better than bowing to the coercive
pressure of the data thieves, and fortunately, we still have
alternatives -- provided we patronize them enough to keep them in
business.

I hope that column got you thinking outside the box about your shopping
choices and whetted your appetite for alternatives. This week, I want to
make your mouth water by talking about Asian, Hispanic, Indian, Middle
Eastern, Greek, and other ethnic grocers located in every major city in
this country. They typically have low prices and a great assortment of
meat and produce. They come in all sizes -- from small storefronts
tucked away in strip malls to huge mega-marts with streaming banners and
their own parking lots. Most are family owned, and, from everything I
can gather, they're in the business of selling food, not spying on their
customers.

So what kind of food will you find in an ethnic market? The choices are
so varied it's hard to know where to begin! Let's see...Middle Eastern
markets have the best honey, dates, nuts, and dairy items anywhere,
along with sesame tahini, stuffed grape leaves, and other delectables.
Asian markets have fantastic produce and fish, and sell unique cuts of
meat. Their soft drinks are extraordinary (ever tasted cantaloupe soda?)
and their kitchenware departments sell handy gadgets you'd never find
anywhere else.

Indian markets sell peas, lentils, and rice at great prices, along with
boxes of pre-mixed spices with recipes on the back to help even
beginners make foolproof authentic dishes. They also carry delicious
breads, fruits, and condiments, and sell a sandalwood soap that alone is
worth the trip. Greek markets specialize in fresh olives and feta,
oregano, lamb, pita bread, and, of course, homemade baklava and
spanakopita. Stop into a Mexican market to find tortillas hot from the
grill, fresh, flavorful cheeses, inexpensive meats, plentiful beans, and
more chilies than you can shake a stick at.

Hungry yet? Good. You are unlikely to find those items at a sterilized,
plasticized, corporate grocery chain. Even if you could, it wouldn't be
the same. Plus you'd pay a whole lot more.

In addition to saving you money and avoiding the database, shopping at
an ethnic grocer means you can snazz up your meals with all those exotic
ingredients. If you do find a store you like, consider buying a cookbook
specific to that cuisine to help you take advantage of the bounty. (Make
sure the cookbook uses the units you are accustomed to, e.g.,
American/British measures vs. the metric system.) I've also gotten
recipe tips and advice on how to cook particularly exotic items by
asking my fellow shoppers or even the cashier.

The main downside to these markets -- the fact that they are unlikely to
carry hydrogenated-fat-laden, overprocessed, name-brand "American food"
and instead specialize in food you actually have to cook yourself -- is,
to my mind, one of their greatest assets. Corporate processed food
giants Kraft, Nestle, Sarah Lee, Coca-Cola, Pepsi, and Kellogg's are all
heavily invested in RFID technology (See:
http://www.spychips.com/rfid_sponsors.html for a list of companies that
helped fund the creation of RFID for use in consumer products). Kraft
and Nestle are already tagging individual products at the Metro Future
Store in Germany. They hope to use RFID tracking tags to influence
consumers' in-store behavior (see:
http://www.spychips.com/metro/partners.html for details about their
motivations).

In case you needed convincing, this week's news items underscore the
need to find shopping alternatives and to keep small, privacy-friendly
stores in business.

Bon Appetit!

=====================================================================

CASPIAN: Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering
Opposing supermarket "loyalty" cards and other retail surveillance
schemes since 1999

http://www.nocards.org/
http://www.spychips.com/

You're welcome to duplicate and distribute this message to others who
may find it of interest.

=====================================================================
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 07, 2004 9:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Big Brother is zipping faster and faster towards us.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2004 4:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

linc wrote:
Big Brother is zipping faster and faster towards us.

actually been here a while its are awarness of him thats starting to move faster for some of us.
if george w bushwell gets his way 1984 will be as real as real can be!
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 13, 2004 2:59 pm    Post subject: RFID Makes Its Mark Reply with quote

RFID Makes Its Mark
[September 13, 2004] A standard marking system will identify smart tags at a
glance.
Read the article:
http://nl.internet.com/ct.html?rtr=on&s=1,1476,1,3j69,ez3y,9s3s,a9gz
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2004 7:32 pm    Post subject: Theme park takes visitors to RFID-land Reply with quote

A Florida theme park is helping parents keep track of their kids--by giving them wristbands embedded with high-tech radio signal technology.

Wannado City issues the radio frequency identification (RFID) wristbands to all visitors as part of general admission to the park, according to a release from Texas Instruments, the maker of the wristbands. The theme park opened last month in the Fort Lauderdale area.

http://news.com.com/Theme+park+takes+visitors+to+RFID-land/2100-1006_3-5366509.html?tag=nefd.hed
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 20, 2004 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

IBM EXPANDS RFID SERVICES FOR MANUFACTURERS
IBM will offer a range of new services to help industrial firms
respond to retail and government pressure to implement
radio-frequency identification. RFID services will include
consulting, developing the business case, technological proof of
concept, and full rollout of the systems.
http://www.net-security.org/news.php?id=6070
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2004 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear CASPIAN members and supporters:

I have disturbing news from the RFID front lines. CASPIAN has uncovered
evidence of industry plans to deploy RFID tracking devices in consumer
clothing items.

A $600 million company called Checkpoint has developed prototype labels
containing RFID spychips for Abercrombie & Fitch, Calvin Klein, and
Champion sportswear. These tags contain tiny computer chips with unique
ID numbers that can be read remotely by anyone with the right equipment.

CNET picked up the story on Friday, September 24th. You can read it at:
http://networks.silicon.com/lans/0,39024663,39124341,00.htm

Photos of the spychipped clothing labels can be seen on our website at:
http://www.spychips.com/press-releases/checkpoint-photos.html

Potentially, people wearing the tagged clothing items could be
identified and tracked as they pass through Checkpoint-equipped doorways
and store portals, as they stand near Checkpoint's retail "smart
shelves" containing hidden RFID reader devices, or when they enter
Checkpoint's planned RFID "smart zones" in stores.

Checkpoint has an infrastructure of anti-theft reader devices already in
place at stores and libraries around the world. (Look at the bottom of
the next security portal you pass through and you may see the Checkpoint
name.) These portals could be retrofitted to silently read and record
the unique ID numbers contained in Checkpoint's new clothing tags, or in
any other item Checkpoint may be tagging.

Since there is no legal requirement for companies to tell consumers when
products they buy contain RFID tags, this may already be happening.

Earlier this year, Checkpoint announced the purchase of 100 million RFID
tags from vendor Matrics. Nearly a year ago, a senior Checkpoint
executive boasted that "the technology is ready to pilot," and revealed
that "we're working with forward-thinking consumer product goods
manufacturers and retail clients on pilots."

CASPIAN, on the other hand, will be working with consumers on an
aggressive response to this privacy threat. Roll up your sleeves and get
ready for a good fight.

In freedom,

Katherine Albrecht
CASPIAN Founder and Director

=====================================================================
Links to more information:

Checkpoint's RFID-laced clothing labels
http://www.spychips.com/press-releases/checkpoint-photos.html

CASPIAN's press release:
http://www.spychips.com/press-releases/checkpoint.html

CNET article: "Retailer to put RFID chips in all clothing"
http://networks.silicon.com/lans/0,39024663,39124341,00.htm

Checkpoint is "the world's largest integrator of RFID technology into
consumer product packaging"
http://www.checkpointsystems.com/content/news/press_releases_archives_display.aspx?news_id=59

Checkpoint and GOLIATH to use RFID for point-of-purchase advertising
http://www.checkpointsystems.com/content/news/press_releases_display.aspx?news_id=61

Checkpoint buys 100 million RFID tags from Matrics
http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/articleview/853/1/1/

Checkpoint ready for pilots, demos "smart shelf" and "smart zone"
http://www.checkpointsystems.com/content/news/press_releases_archives_display.aspx?news_id=58

Learn more about "smart shelves" from our Gillette boycott site
http://www.boycottgillette.com/spychips.html

=====================================================================

Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering (CASPIAN)
is a grass-roots consumer group fighting retail surveillance schemes
since 1999. With thousands of members in all 50 U.S. states and over 30
countries worldwide, CASPIAN seeks to educate consumers about marketing
strategies that invade their privacy and to encourage privacy-conscious
shopping habits across the retail spectrum.

For more information, see:
http://www.spychips.com and http://www.nocards.org

You're welcome to duplicate and distribute this message to others who
may find it of interest.
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 30, 2004 11:59 am    Post subject: CENSORSHIP: RFID Industry attempts to suppress damaging phot Reply with quote

CENSORSHIP: RFID Industry attempts to suppress damaging photos

Photographs of RFID Clothing Labels "Unauthorized"
Advanstar threatens CASPIAN founder: Pull or else

Photographs taken by privacy activist and writer Katherine Albrecht at
the Frontline Expo 2004 conference are "unauthorized" according to
Advanstar. The event management/PR firm has threatened to ban Albrecht,
founder and director of CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy
Invasion and Numbering) from future events it organizes unless she
"refrain[s] from making the photos available."

The photographs in dispute show Checkpoint RFID-enabled prototypes of
Abercrombie & Fitch, Calvin Klein, Champion and other name brand
clothing labels.

"The notion that I somehow 'surreptitiously' photographed the displays
at your event is baffling," Albrecht said in a written response to
Advanstar. She characterized Advanstar’s threat as "an attempt to censor
images that fairly and accurately depict the activities that took place
at their conference."

Advanstar’s censorship "request," and Albrecht’s response are posted at:

http://www.spychips.com/frontline-letter.html

Advanstar made the decision to designate Albrecht as "press" for the
event. A sign posted at the entrance to the exhibit hall indicated
anyone designated as 'press' could take photographs. In addition to
representing her organization's online RFID publication,
www.spychips.com, Albrecht attended the event to gather information for
a well-known computer industry magazine.

"The photographs I took of RFID tags hidden in clothing labels and other
consumer items document an issue of great public concern, and I plan to
publish them over Advanstar's objections," said Albrecht. "The RFID
industry's efforts to keep these images hidden underscores the danger
the public faces from this powerful and insidious surveillance
technology and the companies that would deploy it in secrecy."

In addition to the RFID clothing tag photos, Albrecht also documented
the item-level tagging of Huggies baby wipes, Kimberly Clark diapers,
Nyquil cold medicine, CVS vitamins, Similac baby formula, and Lanacane
cream. Rather than bow to censorship demands, Albrecht has also posted
these images at:

http://www.spychips.com/more-frontline-photos.html

The RFID tagging of these items is disturbing from a consumer privacy
standpoint, since the RFID industry has lately assured lawmakers and the
press that they are interested only in "supply side" inventory tracking
on crates and pallets.

Item-level tagging of consumer goods violates a call for a moratorium
issued by CASPIAN and over 40 of the world's leading privacy and civil
liberties organizations last November.

=====================================================================

CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering)
is a grass-roots consumer group fighting retail surveillance schemes
since 1999. With thousands of members in all 50 U.S. states and over 30
countries worldwide, CASPIAN seeks to educate consumers about marketing
strategies that invade their privacy and to encourage privacy-conscious
shopping habits across the retail spectrum.

For more information, see:
http://www.spychips.com and http://www.nocards.org

You're welcome to duplicate and distribute this message to others who
may find it of interest.
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 30, 2004 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

looks like big blue is about to spend megga bucks on this rfid tags!!!


IBM in Major RFID Expansion
[September 27, 2004] Big Blue will spend $250 million to solidify its presence
in a sector it sees as high-growth.
Read the article:
http://nl.internet.com/ct.html?rtr=on&s=1,15eo,1,cfhp,25li,9s3s,a9gz
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 05, 2004 11:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I joined Caspian and got their latest newsletter.
It set me thinking along these lines.

Assume the RFID tags come into being, then the people promoting the system would be under the same scrutiny as the rest of us, they along with our govt officials would not be able to play around i.e. a weekend with the secretary etc. however if they choose to remove the tags there would be no record of them, so if something happened, they wouldn't be able to prove where they were, which in itself would make them more suspect.

Come on lads drop this idea before you land yourself in more trouble than you can explain away.
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 05, 2004 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

linc helo
your right they will be watched too but they are makeing real big money from this so to them its miniscule and they probably have a way to opt out!
Confused
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2004 3:12 pm    Post subject: well this use for rfid is ok. Reply with quote

SCAN THIS BOOK

By P.J. Connolly

Posted October 01, 2004 3:00 PM Pacific Time

RFID is a technology that can be useful or misused, depending on one's
perspective. Here in the People's Republic of San Francisco, some folks
are upset with the public library. That itself is not news -- the
library administration has in recent years gone out of its way to handle
sensitive issues in an insensitive manner. But a plan to tag books with
RFID chips has some privacy activists absolutely wigged out.
As incredible as it may seem to those readers who know how I feel about
Big Brother-like government behavior, I'm in favor of chipping the
books. Why? Well, like every other issue, it's all about whose ox is
gored.

Twenty years ago, my college library had a policy of allowing juniors
and seniors to reserve an open desk in the stacks and check out books to
the desk; these books couldn't be removed from the library without
checking them out against the student ID.

A couple of days before the Thanksgiving holiday, I found the books I
would need for a paper that was due in early December, checked them out
to an open desk, and went home for the weekend. When I returned, the
books were gone. Someone had filched them, and because the library had
more nooks and crannies than an English muffin, I knew I wasn't going to
see them again. It took a few months to get the library to stop
badgering me about the books, adding insult to injury.

Had alma mater's library employed RFID tagging back then, I might have
gotten the books back in time to finish the paper. I certainly wouldn't
have been going to the main desk every other week for the spring term
explaining that no, the books hadn't reappeared and that the staff would
be more likely to come across them than I was.

Sometimes I wonder whether people stay up at nights thinking about
conspiracy theories involving RFID, black helicopters, and the FBI.
Granted, civil liberties seem to be at a premium these days, but if
anyone imagines that a library is going to spend money on an RFID system
that's capable of doing anything more than bleeping when one gets within
a three-foot range of the book being sought, they need to either start
taking their meds or have the dosage re-evaluated.

I come down squarely with a foot in each camp: I want "automatic kill"
for the RFID tags on the goods I purchase. For those I borrow -- library
books, DVDs, and so on -- I'll settle for what amounts to an "automatic
zombie" mode. This would deactivate RFID outside the owner's premises
while allowing the tag to re-enable itself on re-entry. That's a
reasonable compromise.

P.J. Connolly is a senior analyst at the InfoWorld Test Center.
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 14, 2004 11:32 am    Post subject: May I scan the bar code in your arm? Reply with quote

May I scan the bar code in your arm?

By HELEN BRANSWELL
Canadian Press

Forget about temperature-taking and blood-pressure checking. In the bright, near future, the first step for people seeking medical care may be to have their bicep read by an electronic scanner seeking data stored on an implanted chip.
http://www.globetechnology.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20041014.gthchip1014/BNStory/Technology/
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 14, 2004 4:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

these are the rfid tags that there going to implant into us to track our every movement!


October 14, 2004
Identity Badge Worn Under Skin Approved for Use in Health Care
By BARNABY J. FEDER
and TOM ZELLER Jr.

The Food and Drug Administration has cleared the way for a Florida company to market implantable chips that would provide easy access to individual medical records.

The approval, which the company announced yesterday, is expected to bring to public attention a simmering debate over a technology that has evoked Orwellian overtones for privacy advocates and fueled fears of widespread tracking of people with implanted radio frequency tags, even though that ability does not yet exist.

Applied Digital Solutions, based in Delray Beach, Fla., said that its devices, which it calls VeriChips, could save lives and limit injuries from errors in medical treatment. And it expressed hope that such medical uses would accelerate the acceptance of under-the-skin ID chips as security and access-control devices.

Scott R. Silverman, chairman and chief executive of Applied Digital, said the F.D.A.'s approval should help the company overcome "the creepy factor" of implanted tags and the suspicion it has stirred.

"We believe there are far fewer people resisting this today," Mr. Silverman said. But it is far from clear whether implanted identification tags can overcome opposition from those who fear new levels of personal surveillance and from some fundamentalist religious groups who contend that the tags may be the "mark of the beast" referred to in the Book of Revelation.

In Applied Digital's vision, patients implanted with the chips could receive more effective care because doctors, other emergency-room personnel and ambulance crews equipped with Applied's handheld radio scanners would be able to read a unique 16-digit number on the chip.

The chip does not contain any records, but with the number, the care provider would be able to retrieve medical information about blood type, drug histories and other critical data stored in computers. The records could be easily updated.

Tiny radio frequency identification, or RFID, tags similar to VeriChip have been embedded in livestock and pets in the millions in recent years as a more secure form of identification than external tags. But no device maker has yet been able to create a market for human implantable tags like VeriChip, which are the size of a grain of rice and are inserted under the skin of the arm or hand with a syringe.

Applied Digital's distributors overseas have achieved some highly publicized, if limited successes. This summer, Rafael Macedo de la Concha, Mexico's attorney general, announced that he and scores of his subordinates had received implanted chips that control access to a secure room and documents considered vital in Mexico's struggle with drug cartels.

Also, Solusat, the sole distributor of VeriChip in Mexico, says about 1,000 people have received the chip implants to link to their medical records. "You can have all the benefits of radio identification," a Solusat executive, Antonio Aceves, said, "but now it is inside your body."

In March, the Baja Beach Club in Barcelona began offering VeriChips to regular patrons who wanted to dispense with traditional identification and credit cards. About 50 "V.I.P.'s" have received the chip so far, according to a spokesman, which allows them to link their identities to a payment system. The program has been expanded to a club in Rotterdam also owned by Baja, and about 35 people there have signed up for the implants, the company said.

VeriChip announced last week that it had signed a distribution agreement with a British company, Surge IT Solutions, which it said intended to use the technology to control access to government facilities. And Antonia Giorgio Antonucci, an Italian doctor, is leading a study using VeriChip at the National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani in Rome.

"We want to see if the doctors think the device is practical or not," Dr. Antonucci said.

Applied Digital has been free to sell VeriChip in the United States for nonmedical applications, but lack of acceptance of the technology made F.D.A. approval for medical uses a high priority.

"I've believed all along that the medical application was the best, followed by security and financial applications," Mr. Silverman said.

Still, the science-fiction specter of a nation of drones tagged with sub-dermal bar codes may be a difficult image for the company to overcome in selling its technology.

Online conspiracy theorists, for example, often attach abilities to the technology that do not exist, like the ability to track individuals via satellite.

But real privacy concerns have emerged. "At the point you place the chip beneath the skin, you're saying you will not have the ability to remove the ID tracking device," said Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a public interest advocacy group in Washington. "I think, increasingly, if this takes off - and it's still not clear that it will - the real social debate begins around prisoners and parolees, and perhaps even visitors to the U.S. That's where the interest in being able to identify and track people is."

Indeed, the debate over civil liberties and privacy has made discussing any practical benefits of a technology like VeriChip harder.

"The fact that we're engaged in such a deep, fundamental privacy debate really does complicate the prospect for this kind of technology," said Clyde Wayne Crews Jr., director of technology studies at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, a regulatory research group in Washington. "We haven't even sorted out the appropriateness of a RFID tag that goes on a pallet of tomatoes," Mr. Crews said, "much less one that can go under a person's skin."

Applied Digital has tried to counter such concerns by arguing that the implantation of chips is voluntary and the only records linked to a VeriChip will be those authorized by the person with the chip.

But critics say that if the technology gains a foothold, employers, government authorities and others with power over individuals could dictate how it is used. For instance, if chips were to replace dog tags as military identification, the decision would not be up to the discretion of individual soldiers.

The evolution of radio identification technology also concerns some critics. Passive tags like VeriChip do not broadcast radio waves and cannot now be used to track a person's movements. And current scanners cannot read the passive chip from more than a few feet away. But design advances or the addition of a separate power source for the chip could expand those ranges and make tracking possible.

Mr. Silverman has said that the current chip could help managers of high-security installations like nuclear power plants locate people in the building because scanners in doorways should be able to track who enters and leaves a room.

Applied Digital has VeriChip distribution agreements with companies in several states, but those have been largely dormant. It said it hoped to find big medical distribution companies to market the chip to doctors' offices, specialty clinics and emergency rooms.

Dr. Richard Seeley, Applied Digital's medical adviser, said the company would concentrate on winning acceptance of the chip among patients with complex problems like diabetes, which require them to see many doctors, and those with disorders like Alzheimer's disease.

Dr. Seeley said the company was also talking to large orthopedics companies to demonstrate the value of linking the chip to medical devices like hip and knee implants.

Mr. Silverman said that surveys had shown that 14 percent to 22 percent of people would consider having the implant, but more than 80 percent of those surveyed said they would consider having the implant if the question was framed to show a medical benefit from the chip.

Applied Digital, which has been losing money for years, cautioned yesterday that it did not expect substantial revenue or profit from VeriChip anytime soon. But investors were optimistic enough about the F.D.A. news to send the company's shares up 68 percent, to close at $3.57 yesterday. Shares of Digital Angel, a subsidiary of Applied Digital that makes animal tags and manufactures the VeriChip, rose nearly 29 percent, to $3.49.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17, 2004 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Human RFID tags anger privacy advocates
By Munir Kotadia, ZDNet Australia
15 October 2004

Privacy advocates are outraged at the US Food and Drug Administrations' approval of using RFID chips inside humans for medical purposes

According to Applied Digital Systems, the US-based company that makes the chips, the FDA approved its RFID chips on Wednesday for use in hospitals on humans. The approval came after a year-long review.

http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/security/0,2000061744,39163117,00.htm
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 8:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear CASPIAN members and subscribers:

As you may know, last week the FDA approved the VeriChip ID implant for
medical use in humans (along with a whole class of similar implants).

While VeriChip promoters discuss only the "benefits" of chip
implantation, CASPIAN researchers have uncovered a host of serious
potential medical dangers associated with the VeriChip.

We have outlined details in the press release below and in a special web
report at:

http://www.spychips.com/reports/verichip-fda.html

As I have discussed on NPR, CNN, NBC, and elsewhere in the last week,
the VeriChip is bad news for consumers, putting their health, privacy
and security at risk.

Please read this material and share it with others.

In freedom,
Katherine Albrecht, CASPIAN

http://www.spychips.com
http://www.nocards.org
http://www.boycottGillette.com

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
OCTOBER 19, 2004

FDA Letter Raises Questions about VeriChip Safety, Data Security
Implantable RFID device "poses potential risks to health"

Electrical hazards, MRI incompatibility, adverse tissue reaction, and
migration of the implanted transponder are just a few of the potential
risks associated with the Verichip ID implant device, according to an
October 12, 2004 letter issued by the Food and Drug Administration
(FDA).

CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering)
has obtained a copy of the letter and posted it on the group's RFID
website at http://www.spychips.com/reports/verichip-fda.html.

"For a device purported to help patients, the VeriChip has serious
medical downsides," said Katherine Albrecht, Founder and Director of
CASPIAN. "By omitting this information from their press material, the
companies marketing the VeriChip have painted an inaccurately rosy
picture of their product that could mislead consumers into believing the
devices are completely safe."

Albrecht cites MRI incompatibility as perhaps the most serious issue. An
MRI machine uses powerful magnetic fields coupled with pulsed radio
frequency (RF) fields. According to the FDA's Primer on Medical Device
Interactions with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Systems, "electrical
currents may be induced in conductive metal implants" that can cause
"potentially severe patient burns."

"Patients contemplating a VeriChip implant need to know that the FDA has
raised MRI incompatibity as a potential risk," she said. "If it's a
choice between a potentially life-saving diagnostic procedure or a
VeriChip implant, I believe most patients would choose the MRI."

In addition to outlining a number of health risks, the FDA letter also
cites the risk of "compromised information security" among its concerns.
The VeriChip ID implant, about the size of a grain of rice, uses radio
waves to transmit medical and financial account information to reader
devices. There is a risk that these transmissions could be intercepted
and duplicated by others or that the devices could be used to track an
individual's movements and location.

"Once you're chipped, you can be identified by doorway portal readers
without your knowledge," says Albrecht, referring to a VeriChip reader
sold by value added resellers such as FindMe, LLC
(http://www.findmellc.com/verichip_portal.asp). "That tracking
potential, coupled with VeriChip's potential health risks make the
VeriChip a very poor choice for medical patients seeking safety and
security."

Albrecht said her group will be contacting the FDA to get more specifics
about the dangers outlined in its letter. She also plans to contact the
Digital Angel Corporation, manufacturer of the VeriChip; VeriChip, the
technology licensee; and VeriChip's parent company, Applied Digital.

=====================================================================

CASPIAN (Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering)
is a grass-roots consumer group fighting retail surveillance schemes
since 1999. With thousands of members in all 50 U.S. states and over 30
countries worldwide, CASPIAN seeks to educate consumers about marketing
strategies that invade their privacy and to encourage privacy-conscious
shopping habits across the retail spectrum.

For more information, see:
http://www.spychips.com and http://www.nocards.org

You're welcome to duplicate and distribute this message to others who
may find it of interest.

=====================================================================
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 24, 2004 11:08 pm    Post subject: RFID: Product or People Tracking? Reply with quote

RFID: Product or People Tracking?
by Larry Stevenson, aka Prince_Serendip, CastleCops Staff Writer
Oct 24, 2004

An amazing tecnological revolution has begun, bigger and better than the use of barcodes on manufactured products in the 1980's. The cost savings potential for businesses that use it are enormous.

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is causing vast changes in the movements of products from source to sales. As businesses rush to use this new technology, the needs and concerns of consumers are being pushed aside. Worldwide use of RFID brings serious concerns about protecting privacy for all consumers.

http://computercops.biz/article-5438--0-0.html
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2004 2:12 pm    Post subject: RFID RIGHTS Reply with quote

NOKIA ADDS RFID TO LATEST HANDSETS
Near Field Communication shell system offers touch-based
interactions.
http://www.net-security.org/news.php?id=6427

RFID RIGHTS
The rush by Wal-Mart and other companies to put radio frequency
identification devices in their goods could imperil consumer privacy.
http://www.net-security.org/news.php?id=6440
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 19, 2004 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CASPIAN NEWSLETTER, 11/19/04: Consumer Power, Privacy, and RFID

=====================================================================

Consumer privacy and RFID newsletter
Edited by Sunni Maravillosa
(Yay! She's back! -KA)

NEWS:
1- Houston kids tagged and tracked like inventory
2- FDA supports RFID tags on pharmaceuticals
3- Wal-Mart's data outstrips entire Internet
4- Airlines must turn over passenger data to TSA next week
5- U.S. passports to get RFID chips
6- Wal-Mart expands RFID use to Sam's Club
7- Albertsons moving forward with RFID tagging plans
8- Should you get a chip in your shoulder?
9- Will your cell phone become your wallet?
10- Lessons from Lexmark
11- FDA gives RFID big push in pharmaceutical labeling
12- What RFID rights?

CASPIAN ACTIVISTS UPDATE
1- Katherine Albrecht is all over the media!
2- Australian CASPIAN member publishes novel
3- CASPIAN members sound off

TOOLS YOU CAN USE:
1- CASPIAN member's novel a great educational tool
2- Arguments against national sales tax
3- PBS show "The Persuaders" available online

=====================================================================
HOUSTON SCHOOLKIDS TAGGED AND TRACKED LIKE INVENTORY
by Katherine Albrecht, CASPIAN Director
=====================================================================

Why do creepy RFID initiatives seem to gravitate to Texas, even though
Texans are among the most privacy and freedom-loving people in the
nation? The latest assault involves the children of the Spring
Independent School District, just north of Houston, where 28,000
students will soon be issued RFID badges that will track them as they
get on and off school buses.

Apparently, RFID reader devices in the buses scan the kids and send
their data across town to police and school officials. (Excuse me, did I
read that right? Police?!?) Of course, since the kids could lose or
trade their cards, some bright bulbs are already considering RFID
implants as a more secure alternative.

Despite the fact that no child has ever been lost or abducted in the
Spring district, students are being RFID tagged "just in case" (and at a
considerable cost, too).

This program, if allowed to continue, would mark a disastrous turn for
privacy and civil liberties in this country and set a terrible
precedent. The tracking of school children is especially loathsome,
since not only are kids a captive audience (in this regard, public
school students are second only to prisoners and the military), but they
are not old enough to vote out the perpetrators -- or even to take their
grievances against them to a court of law.

The program's impact on kids is summed up in the words of a 15-year-old,
quoted as saying the program "makes me feel kind of like an animal." Is
this how we, as a society, actually plan to treat the next generation of
Americans? Are we really so intent on numbering, watching, and
dehumanizing kids that we will ignore the impact of our technology on
their independence and psychological wellbeing?

Kids must rely on adults to let them know what is and isn't appropriate
in a free society. We adults, who are older and wiser and know the
historical dangers of unchecked government power, have an obligation to
look out for their interests. We must take a stand to protect our kids
-- and indeed, ourselves -- from the busybodies who would have us all
under lock and key (for our own safety, of course) the moment we let our
guard down.

CASPIAN has many committed, freedom-loving members in the Houston area.
If you wonderful folks want to plan a time and a date to rally to these
kids' defense, CASPIAN will get the word out to the media and spread the
message around the world not to mess with Texas. (And especially not its
kids!)

Write us at "Houston @/at nocards.org" if you want to take a stand.

Source: New York Times via CNET, November 17, 2004
http://news.com.com/In+Texas,+28,000+students+test+an+electronic+eye/2100-1039_3-5456061.html
or
http://tinyurl.com/6etrq

=========================
MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD
=========================

Are you as disgusted as I am with plans to monitor kids like cattle?
If so, write an email to the people behind this program:

Dr. Michael Hinojosa
Spring Independent School District Superintendent
michaelh@springisd.org

Brian Weisinger
Spring ISD Transportation Director
brianW@springisd.org

Alan Bragg
Spring Police Chief
alanb@springisd.org

Regina Curry
Assistant Superintendent
reginac@springisd.org

Cindy Doyle
Director of Community Relations
cdoyle@springisd.org

To write to all of these people at once, copy the email addresses below
and paste into the "TO:" line in your email:

michaelh@springisd.org, brianW@springisd.org,
alanb@springisd.org,reginac@springisd.org, cdoyle@springisd.org

If you'd like us to publish your comments in an upcoming newsletter,
send a carbon copy to CASPIAN by pasting "sunni @/at nocards.org" in the
"CC:" line of your email. Note that unless you state otherwise, we will
print your first name and city with your message, but we'll keep your
last name and email address confidential.

=====================================================================
FDA CALLS FOR RFID TAGS ON PHARMACEUTICALS
=====================================================================

The FDA gave its blessing to using RFID chips in pharmaceutical labels,
using the justification of drug counterfeiting. However, by the FDA's
own admission in this article, fewer than 1% of American drugs are
counterfeit. Pfizer and Purdue are among the drug makers who have
announced they'll start using RFID. Scary quote:

"Right away, for the first time ever, a cop can say 'that bottle came
from a crime scene and this suspect is in possession of stolen
property'"

Katherine attended a meeting recently where an industry executive
outlined his vision for RFID tagged drugs. His plan involved RFID reader
devices in patients' homes to allow officials to monitor people's use of
prescription drugs. The reason? Increased "compliance" means more money
for the industry.

Source: Yahoo News, November 15, 2004
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=571&ncid=751&e=1&u=/nm/20041115/hl_nm/health_tags_dc

or http://tinyurl.com/4aa2c

=====================================================================
WAL-MART'S DATA OUTSTRIPS ENTIRE INTERNET
=====================================================================

Straight from the New York Times article:

"Plenty of retailers collect data about their stores and their shoppers,
and many use the information to try to improve sales, but Wal-Mart
amasses more data about the products it sells and its shoppers' buying
habits than any other company, so much so that some privacy advocates
worry about potential for abuse."

Since, as the next paragraph in the article states, the data include
Social Security numbers, drivers' license numbers and more, what
reasonable person wouldn't be concerned? The article continues, stating
that the amount of information Wal-Mart "houses indefinitely" (yes, you
read that right; the information is apparently never discarded) is more
than double the entire content on the Internet!

Again, from the article:

"By next October, the company will require its biggest suppliers to tag
shipments to some of its distribution centers with tiny transmitters
that would eventually let Wal-Mart track every item that it sells."

The article includes a quote from CASPIAN founder Katherine Albrecht who
points to the huge variety of personal information Wal-Mart could amass
on customers once they have their SSNs and driver's license numbers.
Even though the piece focuses on the powerful use of consumer data by
Wal-Mart, it's a good way to introduce individuals to the realities of
consumer privacy and data-mining.

Source: New York Times/Denver Post, November 15, 2004
http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36~33~2534195,00.html

=====================================================================
AIRLINES MUST TURN OVER PASSENGER DATA TO TSA NEXT WEEK
=====================================================================

November 23 is the deadline for all U.S. airlines to turn over passenger
data so that the Transportation Security Administration can test the
Secure Flight passenger pre-screening system. Here are the details of
the information to be shared:

"Once each of the 72 domestic airlines submits data, including passenger
name, reservation date, travel itinerary, and form of payment for
domestic flights between June 1 and June 30 of this year, testing is
expected to last through the end of January."

The data they get will also be compared to existing "no-fly" lists.

Source: InformationWeek, November 15, 2004
http://www.informationweek.com/showArticle.jhtml;?articleID=52601881

=====================================================================
U.S. PASSPORTS TO GET RFID CHIPS
=====================================================================

The U.S. government appears to have taken the worst possible route to
"provide security" by putting RFID chips into passports. They've chosen
to use a remote-reading chip that beams unencrypted information to a
reader. That means that unless you've taken pains to protect your
chipped passport from being read without your knowledge and consent, it
will beam "the passport holder's name, address, date and place of birth,
and send along a digital photograph."

The new chipped passports will go first to diplomats and State
Department employees; citizen passports will start to be chipped in
spring 2005. Sounds like a good reason not to procrastinate on getting a
passport.

Source: Wired, October 21, 2004
http://www.wired.com/news/privacy/0,1848,65412,00.html?tw=wn_tophead_1

=====================================================================
WAL-MART EXPANDS RFID USE TO SAM'S CLUB STORE
=====================================================================

Wal-Mart continues its RFID push, announcing that RFID-tagged cases and
pallets will be shipped to a Sam's Club store in Plano, TX. Since Sam's
Club is a bulk-discount store, there's a good possibility that those
RFID chips will go home with many consumers. According to the article:

"Wal-Mart will alert customers of cases that contain RFID tags via signs
and literature that explains RFID, and they can remove the tags after
purchase, a spokesman says."

The Plano store where the chipped packaging will be for sale is located
at Highway 121 and Ohio Drive. This looks like a good target for an
educational campaign or protest. Anyone in Plano game?

Source: InformationWeek, November 1, 2004
http://www.informationweek.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=51201650

=====================================================================
ALBERTSONS MOVING FORWARD WITH RFID TAGGING PLANS
=====================================================================

I guess their loyalty card woes weren't enough to convince Albertsons to
listen to consumers; the company has recently released its plan for RFID
tagging of shipments of merchandise to their warehouse. The pilot
project will begin in early 2005 and will focus on Dallas/Fort Worth
Albertsons stores. They hope to have all suppliers tagging crates and
pallets by October of 2005.

Source: RFID Journal, November 12, 2004
http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/articleview/1227/1/1/

=====================================================================
SHOULD YOU GET A CHIP IN YOUR SHOULDER?
=====================================================================

Presumably, if you're a subscriber to this newsletter you know the
answer to that question ... but this MSN article does a good job of
presenting a balanced view of chipping individuals. Author Josh McHugh
saves the best for last: his final two paragraphs provide good
information on how readers can be used, and links to various models. MSN
often changes their links, so check this one before it goes 404.

Source: Slate/MSN, November 10, 2004
http://slate.msn.com/id/2109477/

Incidentally, Josh featured our work in a great piece he wrote for Wired
this summer. See it here:
http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/12.07/shoppers.html?pg=1

=====================================================================
WILL YOUR CELL PHONE BECOME YOUR WALLET?
=====================================================================

>From the article:

"Some big players in telecommunications and finance, including Motorola,
Nokia, Sony, and MasterCard, think ... that people will rush to make
their phones into a kind of magic wand that effortlessly makes purchases
or retrieves information for them."

Putting all of your sensitive information into one unit -- especially
one that can be easily identified (and therefore targeted) is a
phenomenally bad idea. Doesn't using the Social Security number as a
nearly-universal ID demonstrate that well enough? Security and privacy
concerns are being downplayed here in favor of the gee-whiz factor of
yet another use for RFID (which the reporter refers to as "an RF chip")
technology.

Source: Christian Science Monitor, November 15, 2004
http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/1115/p13s02-wmgn.html?s=u2

=====================================================================
LESSONS FROM LEXMARK
=====================================================================

Printer company Lexmark is getting another black eye, courtesy of
consumers, for its questionable practices. The company was accused of
"planting spyware" on customers' computers. At issue is "undocumented
software that monitors the use of its printers and silently reports back
to a Lexmark-owned company Web site," according to the first article
linked below. However, Lexmark says that users are informed of the
software, named Lexmark Connect, in the driver installation process. (Of
course, we all read these things carefully, right?)

The second article, by Mr. Goodwins, is an excellent overview of the
issues involved. He ends it by stating, "In the end, it's up to the
users." But what if they are unaware of what is happening?

Source: ZD Net, November 11 and 16, 2004
http://news.zdnet.co.uk/internet/security/0,39020375,39173517,00.htm
http://comment.zdnet.co.uk/rupertgoodwins/0,39020691,39174087,00.htm

=====================================================================
WHAT RFID RIGHTS?
=====================================================================

Simson Garfinkel offers a thoughtful analysis of the current state of
voluntary RFID notification in situations where consumers may
unknowingly purchase RFID-tagged products. In doing so, he makes an
important distinction between proprietary RFID devices, and the EPC
chips that are intended to replace the UPC bar codes. He also recounts
some adventures Katherine Albrecht has had in uncovering questionable
business practices with RFID chips.

Source: Technology Review, November 3, 2004
http://www.technologyreview.com/articles/04/11/wo_garfinkel110304.asp

=====================================================================
CASPIAN ACTIVISTS UPDATE
=====================================================================

1. KATHERINE ALBRECHT has been busy speaking out on consumer privacy
issues. It's hard to find an article on consumer privacy that doesn't
include a quote from her. In recent weeks she has discussed the VeriChip
and pharmaceutical tagging on the NBC Nightly News, NPR, CNN, and NBC's
Squawkbox; she has been quoted in the New York Times, Investor's
Business Daily and a host of other domestic publications, and she has
been cited in publications as far away as France, Australia and India.

In addition, Katherine recently participated in an eye-opening yet
entertaining segment on shopper cards by the Canadian Broadcasting
Company.

The written version of the CBC piece is online here:
http://www.cbc.ca/consumers/market/files/services/privacy/loyalty.html

The streaming video (RealPlayer) version of the CBC piece is online
here:
http://www.cbc.ca/consumers/market/files/services/privacy/cards20041024.ram

2. AUSTRALIAN CASPIAN MEMBER publishes a novel. It's a terrific
examination of a boy coming of age in a consumerism-centric society.
Psychologist Shaun Saunders drew on his doctoral dissertation data in
creating the novel, so there's a real feel of imminence to the book,
titled "Mallcity 14". Dr. Saunders was kind enough to send me a copy of
the book, which I have reviewed:

http://www.thepriceofliberty.org/04/10/20/sunni.htm

3. CASPIAN MEMBERS SOUND OFF

Here is just one of the hundreds of email messages of support we receive
each month:

"I will buy a sheep, shear it, card it, spin it, and learn how to knit
before I knowingly buy any clothing with an RFID tag in it."

-Lynn, in Wisconsin

=====================================================================
ACTIVISM TOOLS YOU CAN USE
=====================================================================

1: CASPIAN member's novel a great educational tool

As mentioned above, Dr. Saunders' book "Mallcity 14" is a novel that
touches on many of the privacy issues we're facing today. A novel based
on research may sound intimidating, but Saunders did an excellent job of
creating an interesting story and characters. If you're having trouble
convincing people of the state of consumer privacy today, consider
giving them "Mallcity 14". It's available online from Trafford
Publishers:

http://www.trafford.com/4dcgi/view-item?item=6169

2: Arguments against a national sales tax

Claire Wolfe & Aaron Zelman have written a great article detailing many
reasons to oppose national sales tax. Their article, titled "The
FairTax: A Trojan Horse for America?" echoes CASPIAN founder Katherine
Albrecht's concern that a national sales tax could lead to unprecedented
government surveillance of our purchases and personal belongings, among
other problems. Read it online here:

http://www.jpfo.org/fairtax.htm

3: PBS show "The Persuaders" available online

"The Persuaders" is an interesting examination of the worlds of
marketing and advertising in the U.S. The claim is made that Americans
increasingly rely on advertising for more than purchase information, but
for broader uses, including what to think and whom to trust. If you
missed it last week, it's available from the PBS web site, in either
Windows Media or RealPlayer format, and via high or low-bandwidth
connections.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/persuaders/

=====================================================================

CASPIAN: Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering
Opposing supermarket "loyalty" cards and other retail surveillance
schemes since 1999

http://www.spychips.com/
http://www.nocards.org/

You're welcome to duplicate and distribute this message to others who
may find it of interest.

=====================================================================
_________________
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http://www.openoffice.org/
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2004 9:04 am    Post subject: RFIDs in Your Passport, State-Installed GPS Tracking in Your Reply with quote

RFIDs in Your Passport, State-Installed GPS Tracking in Your Car - Really.
Filed under:

* General

— Aunty @ 11:38 am

RFIDs embedded in your U.S. passport, encoded with your identity, and able to be read at a distance?

GPS devices mandated by law, installed in every single new car, so that the state can monitor your every movement and tax you based on the milage you drive?

It’s not 1984, the Sequel. It’s 2004, the Reality. Both of these measures seem likely before the end of 2005.

California is seriously considering requiring that every single new car in California be fitted with a GPS device which will enable the state to track where the car goes, and how many miles the car has driven between gas fill-ups. This will allow the state, which is seeing gasoline tax revenues fall as trendy, green Californians keep snapping up hybrid cars, to tax each and every motorist - at the gas pump - based on how many miles they have driven from the last gas pump.

http://www.aunty-spam.com/archives/2004/11/18/rfids-in-your-passport-state-installed-gps-tracking-in-your-car-really
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